Interview | Jean-Sébastien Caux: Rethinking Academic Publishing, Open Access & SciPost

Jean-Sébastien Caux is Professor in theoretical condensed matter physics at the University of Amsterdam. A Canadian citizen, he obtained his PhD in Oxford, was postdoctoral Fellow in All Souls, and moved to the Netherlands in 2003. Besides his research activities, he is actively involved in the reform of scientific publishing. He is the founder, implementer and current chairman of open access publication portal SciPost. Jean-Sébastien reflects on the current state of play of the scientific publishing landscape and copyright’s role. He talks about the open access movement and the major hurdles or speed bumps ahead. Jean-Sébastien unravels how his personal frustrations led to the creation of SciPost and discusses the effort’s long term sustainability. He makes a plea to change the institutional mindset and move towards Diamond Open Access. Jean-Sébastien calls for academic rebellion and gives a word of warning about the next can of worms: publishers’ surveillance operations. Finally, he concludes by encouraging his fellow academics to educate themselves about copyright and the academic publishing machine. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Catherine Stihler: Creative Commons, the EU Copyright Directive, and Civil Society’s Role

Catherine Stihler OBE was appointed CEO of Creative Commons, in August 2020, a non-profit organisation that helps overcome legal obstacles to advance better sharing of knowledge and creativity to address the world’s pressing challenges. She has been an international champion for openness as a legislator and practitioner for over 20 years. She was a member of the European Parliament for Scotland representing the Labour Party. At the European Parliament, she became one of Scotland’s longest-serving and most respected legislators. Prior to joining Creative Commons, she served as the CEO of the Open Knowledge Foundation. Catherine reflects on this trajectory that led her to Creative Commons and the lessons learned from the EU Copyright Directive adoption. She talks about the growing importance of Creative Commons licences and the importance of various ongoing legislative developments (e.g. AI, disinformation). She highlights the value of Creative Commons for creativity and knowledge sharing. Finally, throughout the episode she emphasises the need for the community, from libraries to civil society organisations, that are seeking a progressive copyright reform to unite and stand together in order to ensure their voice is heard by policymakers. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Marc Rees: À la Française, de l’Hadopi par la copie privée, jusqu’aux algorithmes de l’Article 17

Marc Rees est journaliste et rédacteur en chef de Next INpact, le site français traitant de tout ce qui est numérique, y compris les commentaires sur les questions actuelles de droit d'auteur. Il se spécialise en droit des nouvelles technologies, dont communication, LCEN, surveillance, données personnelles, et droit d’auteur. Marc est connu comme l’un des meilleurs commentateurs du droit d'auteur, dans le monde francophone. Sur notre podcast, il explique la stratégie de la France de mettre les droits d'auteur au premier plan. Il couvre le rôle de la Présidence Français dans les négociations du Digital Service Act (DSA). Marc réfléchit sur la création de l’Hadopi. Il parle passionnément à propos de la redevance copie privée et les aberrations qu'elle crée. Finalement, Marc souligne l'importance des utilisateurs dans les débats numériques et discute la responsabilité des intermédiaires techniques. Vous préférez regarder nos interviewés enthousiastes décrire les murs du XXIe siècle qui bloquent l'accès à la culture ? Alors regardez le vlog ci-des…

Interview | Katharine Trendacosta: The US DMCA, Upload Filters, SOPA-PIPA, Fanfiction, & Platform Competition

Katharine Trendacosta is Associate Director of Policy and Activism at the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF). Her areas of expertise are competition, broadband access, intellectual property, net neutrality, fair use, free speech online, and intermediary liability. She is the former managing editor of science fiction and science website io9, and spent many years writing about technology policy and pop culture for various publications. Katharine notably talks about the good and the bad of the DMCA and the issues surrounding upload filters. She reflects on why the SOPA-PIPA debate mattered and how the underlying issues still linger. Katharine recalls how fanfiction sparked her interest in copyright and shares her hopes to see more smaller platforms pop-up as alternative avenues for creators and users. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Dr Andres Guadamuz: The EU Copyright Directive, Text & Data Mining, Web3, the Metaverse, & NFTs

Dr Andres Guadamuz is a Reader in Intellectual Property Law at the University of Sussex and the Editor in Chief of the Journal of World Intellectual Property. His main research areas are on artificial intelligence (AI) and copyright, open licensing, cryptocurrencies, and smart contracts. Andres has published two books, the most recent one of which is "Networks, Complexity and Internet Regulation", and he regularly blogs at Technollama.co.uk. He has acted as an international consultant for the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), and has done activist work with Creative Commons. Andres notably talks about the EU Copyright Directive, addressing how the more controversial elements were pushed through and, on a positive note, how it enables text and data mining. He reflects on the interplay between copyright and new hypes like Web3, the Metaverse and NFTs. Andres further shares some thoughts on how copyright and digital policy is being shaped in general and on the copyright implications of Brexit. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Jennie Rose Halperin: A Tech-Positive Future for Libraries, Controlled Digital Lending & US CASE Act

Jennie Rose Halperin, is a facilitator, digital strategist, writer, and editor, who currently serves as the Executive Director of Library Futures: a nonprofit organization that champions equitable access to knowledge. Trained as a librarian, she has worked in content, web development, and digital services of all types, including at the Harvard Law Library, Creative Commons, Safari Books Online/O'Reilly Media, and Mozilla. Jennie notably talks about promoting a technology positive future for libraries. She reflects on the bad and overly complex licensing deals libraries are presented with and looks at the dangers of the US CASE Act for librarians. Jennie further explains the concept of controlled digital lending, and discusses the recent US eBook bills. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Podcast Highlights: Knocking Down Walls, Battles after SOPA, eLending, Excessive Terms & Unfit Rules

Check out this great compilation of key highlights from our Walled Culture podcast/vlog series, launched in September 2021. Our guests talk about knocking down the walls, the continuing battles after SOPA, e-Lending and libraries, and the damages of excessive terms and unfit copyright rules. Full line-up of the guests covered in the mashup below, and links to the full episodes. …

Interview | Katherine Maher: The Monkey Selfie, Public Domain, Freedom of Panorama, the EU Copyright Directive, Remix Culture, & the 20th Century Black Hole

Katherine Maher, advocate for free and open societies, is the former CEO and Executive Director of the Wikimedia Foundation. Her background is in the field of information and communications technology, and she works at non-profits in the international sector, focusing on the use of technology enabling human rights and international developments. She reflects on the ‘monkey selfie’ and its role to help educate people on the public domain, as well as on the complexity to push issues such as freedom of panorama. Katherine looks at how the EU copyright Directive played out, her early encounter with remix culture, and the difficulty of unlocking contemporary art and the 20th century black hole. She closes off by emphasising the need to make the legalistic copyright debate less daunting for citizens to grasp. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Alex Sayf Cummings: Music Piracy, Alternative Remuneration Models, Blurred Lines, SOPA, and Out of Control Copyright Terms and Penalties

Alex Sayf Cummings is a historian of law, technology, labor, public policy, and American cities. A leading voice on pop culture and public history, she has published on a variety of topics, from music history to the information economy. Her teaching focuses on the history of media industries (such as music, publishing, broadcasting) and American legal and political institutions (such as copyright). She covers the music industry’s role in pushing for IP rights, talks about music piracy and how Napster pushed rightholders into the streaming model, and explores how alternative remuneration models are far more beneficial for creators. Alex also talks about the Blurred Lines case, the revolt against SOPA, how copyright terms and penalties have been out of control and why we should resist extending these protection terms. Finally, she calls out music companies’ bluff that they fight on behalf of artists. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Salvador Alcántar Morán: Mexican Copyright Unfit-for-purpose in the Digital age, the Public Domain as a Human Right, and the Need for a True Multistakeholder Approach and a Global Perspective on Copyright

Salvador Alcántar Morán is a lawyer, focused on digital copyright, educational technology and digital communications. He is the co-founder of Wikimedia Mexico and of Creative Commons Mexico. He was also manager of the General Direction of Digital Communications of the Mexico City Government. He talks about how the Mexican copyright framework is not adapted to the digital age and shaped mainly by the creative industries, the copyright industry’s scaremongering tactics. He also explains how the fact that Mexico has the lengthiest copyright term (100 years after the author's death) negatively impacts the country’s collective memory and the public domain. In his view, the public domain should be considered as a human right. He further emphasises the need for normal citizens and other stakeholders, that are currently neglected, to be more involved in shaping a copyright framework that works for the digital age based on a true multistakeholder approach. He also talks about the need for a more global perspective on copyright in general. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Brewster Kahle: Libraries’ Role, 3 Internet Battles, Licensing Pains, the National Emergency Library, and the Internet Archive’s Controlled Digital Lending Efforts vs. the Publishers’ Lawsuit

Brewster Kahle is founder and Digital Librarian of the Internet Archive, one of the largest libraries in the world. Next to his mission to provide universal access to all knowledge, he is a passionate advocate for public Internet access, as well as a successful entrepreneur (Thinking Machines, Wide Area Information Server and Alexa Internet) and a member of the Board of Directors of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF). The Internet Archive, which he founded in 1996, preserves petabytes of data - the books, Web pages, music, television, and software of our cultural heritage, working with hundreds of library and university partners to create a digital library, accessible to all. More than 1 million people use the Internet Archive every day. Most of them seek out the Wayback Machine, making 25+ years of web history accessible. He talks about the role of libraries, the Internet battles we’ve faced and are facing, licensing pains, the National Emergency Library, and how the Internet Archive’s efforts to make culture and knowledge accessible through controlled digital lending are threatened by the publishers’ lawsuit against the Archive. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Lawrence Lessig: Internet Architecture, Remix Culture, Creative Commons, NFTs, Aaron Swartz and the Internet Archive

Professor Lessig is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership at Harvard Law School and notably a founding board member of Creative Commons. The New Yorker has called him the most important thinker on intellectual property in the Internet era. In this podcast episode, he shares his reflections on the interplay between copyright and Internet’s architecture, remix culture, the Creative Commons movement, the rise and benefits of NFTs, the work of Aaron Swartz and the attack on the Internet Archive. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Evan Greer & Lia Holland: Rethinking Copyright, Fighting Creative Monopolies, and Putting an End to Enforcement Excesses

Fight for the Future’s Director, Evan Greer, and Campaigns and Communications Director, Lia Holland, are both digital rights activists who have been active in the music industry. Based on their experience they talk about the need to rethink how artists can be fairly remunerated and the disconnect between the interest of big corporate entities, claiming to speak on behalf of artists, versus the actual needs of creators, especially those that have been marginalized by the music industry. They warn against the excesses from corporations and governments in trying to enforce copyright through massive and automated Internet censorship. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Dr. Eoin O‘Dell: The copyright creation myth, a permission-based society, and EU vs US copyright law

Dr. Eoin O'Dell, Associate Professor of Law at Trinity College Dublin (Dublin University), explains some copyright fundamentals: its origins and basic premises, the creation myth, the shift to a permission-based society, and the differences between the EU and US approaches. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Rebecca Giblin: Reversion Rights, Out-Of-Print Books And How To Fix Copyright

ARC Future Fellow and Associate Professor within the Melbourne Law School, an expert on e-lending, and co-author of "What if we could reimagine copyright?," Rebecca Giblin talks about the crucial but little-known area of reversion rights, how to rescue out-of-print books, and fixing some of the worst problems of copyright by making sure that creators are treated more fairly than they are currently. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Mirela Roncevic: Open Access, Open Science, Scholarly Monographs, E-Book Lending

Scholar, writer, editor, content developer, and publishing and library consultant, Mirela Roncevic talks about the long journey of open access and open science, how to pay for scholarly monographs, and the complex challenges of e-book lending. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog