Interview | Alex Sayf Cummings: Music Piracy, Alternative Remuneration Models, Blurred Lines, SOPA, and Out of Control Copyright Terms and Penalties

Alex Sayf Cummings is a historian of law, technology, labor, public policy, and American cities. A leading voice on pop culture and public history, she has published on a variety of topics, from music history to the information economy. Her teaching focuses on the history of media industries (such as music, publishing, broadcasting) and American legal and political institutions (such as copyright). She covers the music industry’s role in pushing for IP rights, talks about music piracy and how Napster pushed rightholders into the streaming model, and explores how alternative remuneration models are far more beneficial for creators. Alex also talks about the Blurred Lines case, the revolt against SOPA, how copyright terms and penalties have been out of control and why we should resist extending these protection terms. Finally, she calls out music companies’ bluff that they fight on behalf of artists. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Salvador Alcántar Morán: Mexican Copyright Unfit-for-purpose in the Digital age, the Public Domain as a Human Right, and the Need for a True Multistakeholder Approach and a Global Perspective on Copyright

Salvador Alcántar Morán is a lawyer, focused on digital copyright, educational technology and digital communications. He is the co-founder of Wikimedia Mexico and of Creative Commons Mexico. He was also manager of the General Direction of Digital Communications of the Mexico City Government. He talks about how the Mexican copyright framework is not adapted to the digital age and shaped mainly by the creative industries, the copyright industry’s scaremongering tactics. He also explains how the fact that Mexico has the lengthiest copyright term (100 years after the author's death) negatively impacts the country’s collective memory and the public domain. In his view, the public domain should be considered as a human right. He further emphasises the need for normal citizens and other stakeholders, that are currently neglected, to be more involved in shaping a copyright framework that works for the digital age based on a true multistakeholder approach. He also talks about the need for a more global perspective on copyright in general. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Brewster Kahle: Libraries’ Role, 3 Internet Battles, Licensing Pains, the National Emergency Library, and the Internet Archive’s Controlled Digital Lending Efforts vs. the Publishers’ Lawsuit

Brewster Kahle is founder and Digital Librarian of the Internet Archive, one of the largest libraries in the world. Next to his mission to provide universal access to all knowledge, he is a passionate advocate for public Internet access, as well as a successful entrepreneur (Thinking Machines, Wide Area Information Server and Alexa Internet) and a member of the Board of Directors of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF). The Internet Archive, which he founded in 1996, preserves petabytes of data - the books, Web pages, music, television, and software of our cultural heritage, working with hundreds of library and university partners to create a digital library, accessible to all. More than 1 million people use the Internet Archive every day. Most of them seek out the Wayback Machine, making 25+ years of web history accessible. He talks about the role of libraries, the Internet battles we’ve faced and are facing, licensing pains, the National Emergency Library, and how the Internet Archive’s efforts to make culture and knowledge accessible through controlled digital lending are threatened by the publishers’ lawsuit against the Archive. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Lawrence Lessig: Internet Architecture, Remix Culture, Creative Commons, NFTs, Aaron Swartz and the Internet Archive

Professor Lessig is the Roy L. Furman Professor of Law and Leadership at Harvard Law School and notably a founding board member of Creative Commons. The New Yorker has called him the most important thinker on intellectual property in the Internet era. In this podcast episode, he shares his reflections on the interplay between copyright and Internet’s architecture, remix culture, the Creative Commons movement, the rise and benefits of NFTs, the work of Aaron Swartz and the attack on the Internet Archive. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Evan Greer & Lia Holland: Rethinking Copyright, Fighting Creative Monopolies, and Putting an End to Enforcement Excesses

Fight for the Future’s Director, Evan Greer, and Campaigns and Communications Director, Lia Holland, are both digital rights activists who have been active in the music industry. Based on their experience they talk about the need to rethink how artists can be fairly remunerated and the disconnect between the interest of big corporate entities, claiming to speak on behalf of artists, versus the actual needs of creators, especially those that have been marginalized by the music industry. They warn against the excesses from corporations and governments in trying to enforce copyright through massive and automated Internet censorship. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Dr. Eoin O‘Dell: The copyright creation myth, a permission-based society, and EU vs US copyright law

Dr. Eoin O'Dell, Associate Professor of Law at Trinity College Dublin (Dublin University), explains some copyright fundamentals: its origins and basic premises, the creation myth, the shift to a permission-based society, and the differences between the EU and US approaches. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Rebecca Giblin: Reversion Rights, Out-Of-Print Books And How To Fix Copyright

ARC Future Fellow and Associate Professor within the Melbourne Law School, an expert on e-lending, and co-author of "What if we could reimagine copyright?," Rebecca Giblin talks about the crucial but little-known area of reversion rights, how to rescue out-of-print books, and fixing some of the worst problems of copyright by making sure that creators are treated more fairly than they are currently. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Mirela Roncevic: Open Access, Open Science, Scholarly Monographs, E-Book Lending

Scholar, writer, editor, content developer, and publishing and library consultant, Mirela Roncevic talks about the long journey of open access and open science, how to pay for scholarly monographs, and the complex challenges of e-book lending. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Cory Doctorow [Part 2]: New publishing models for creators, Amazon as a frenemy, and the Internet Archive court case

Author, journalist, and activist Cory Doctorow talks about the new publishing models available to creators, the consolidation of the publishing and distribution markets, the emergence of Amazon as a frenemy to publishers and the misunderstandings that led to the Internet Archive court case. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog

Interview | Cory Doctorow [Part 1]: Newspapers, Big Tech, Link Tax, DRM and Right to Repair

Author, journalist, and activist Cory Doctorow talks about the evolution of newspapers, the role and threats posed by big tech, the collateral damage created by link taxes and the impact of digital rights management systems (DRM) on our daily lives, including on our right to repair. Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog