Interview | Evan Greer & Lia Holland – Rethinking Copyright, Fighting Creative Monopolies, and Putting an End to Enforcement Excesses

Fight for the Future’s Director, Evan Greer, and Campaigns and Communications Director, Lia Holland, are both digital rights activists who have been active in the music industry. Based on their experience they talk about the need to rethink how artists can be fairly remunerated and the disconnect between the interest of big corporate entities, claiming to speak on behalf of artists, versus the actual needs of creators, especially those that have been marginalized by the music industry. They warn against the excesses from corporations and governments in trying to enforce copyright through massive and automated Internet censorship.

Do you prefer watching our passionate interviewees talking about the 21st-century walls blocking access to culture? Then check out the vlog below.

Video highlights with timestamps:

00:00 Intro

02:20 Evan talks about their background as a traveling musician, and how a show in Prague brought them to where they are today with Fight For the Future

07:23 Lia goes into her life as a writer, and the struggle her family faced when the 2008 financial crisis and how she had to change her career mindset

14:09 Evan talks about Fight for the Future and the background of the organization and what exactly they fight for

17:41 Lia talks about some of the campaigns that Fight For the Future is currently working on and being recognized for

24:14 Lia describes content monopolies and the major companies and streaming services and the deep flaws they possess

28:52 Evan talks about how artists truly aren’t getting revenue from streaming, but instead the record labels

38:01 Evan dives into the concept of centralization and how it’s the main root of the harm in the industry

45:11 Lia goes more into current campaigns and what they are doing to truly fight back to save our future

49:15 Evan explains how people need to get behind this movement of fighting for the future of the internet as much as they do for other social causes